March 25, 2015 | Posted by Rachel Gillevet | Webmasters

Why Bells And Whistles Are Bad Business In Content Management

Why Bells And Whistles Are Bad Business In Content Management

Today, we’re going to talk about something known as feature bloat. There’s a good chance you’ve heard at least a bit of buzz about it, especially if you’re in the business of content management. Take any modern content management system, development framework, or content utility, and you’ll have at least one or two people saying it’s too bloated – that it’s got too many flashy features for its own good. Read More →

March 20, 2015 | Posted by Rachel Gillevet | Monthly Roundups

The Best Web Design, CMS, and Security Content from Around the Web

The Best Web Design, CMS, and Security Content from Around the Web

Since our last roundup, we’ve celebrated both Valentine’s Day and St. Patrick’s Day, but the big news was the conclusion of the net neutrality debate. The FCC made their decision and you can read all 313 pages of it here.  If that isn’t enough weekend reading material for you, in the roundup below we offer the best recent articles on web design/development, content management systems, and web security. From the FREAK vulnerability to a new way of looking at the most popular WordPress plugins, it has been a busy month.  Without further ado, here’s the best from February and March. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google + for the same great content in 2015!

Web Design and Development

Design Last – How does one design and develop for the responsive web? A lot of methodologies out there try to tackle this problem, but all of them rely on the same classic website development process. It boils down to the following: design and then develop. Read More →

February 16, 2015 | Posted by Rachel Gillevet | Monthly Roundups

The Best Web Design/Development, CMS, and Security Content from Around the Web

The Best Web Design/Development, CMS, and Security Content from Around the Web

2015 is off to a snowy start around the country, especially in Boston, but that hasn’t stopped the seemingly never-ending flow of content hitting the web. Another year and WordPress continues to exert its dominance in the CMS market, but as an article in the roundup points out, it is important not to be influenced by the status quo and choose the right content management system for the right reason. We’ve also found a couple of interesting articles that look at the idea of “mobile first” and user experience respectively, as well as one that offers up the most important rule of web design. Make sure not to miss that. And finally, if your password is password, it’s time for a switch. And don’t just capitalize the P or add a 1. Enjoy this roundup of January’s best and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google + for the same great content the rest of the year!  Read More →

February 3, 2015 | Posted by Rachel Gillevet | Wordpress

Should You Use WordPress’s Multisite Feature?

Should You Use WordPress’s Multisite Feature?

Way back in 2010, WordPress introduced a rather interesting feature called multisite. It was pretty much exactly what it sounds like, allowing users to create multiple websites off the back of the same WordPress installation. In essence, this allowed any webmaster using WordPress to quickly and easily create an entire network of sites, each one with its own unique domain name.

Pretty sweet, right? Read More →

January 29, 2015 | Posted by Rachel Gillevet | Security

A Brief Introduction To Content Security Policy

A Brief Introduction To Content Security Policy

Scripts that originate from a web site are typically trusted to access that site’s resources by browsers, while other sites are not given the same trust. The same origin policy restricts browsers from allowing scripts from outside of the site’s context from accessing the information that it contains. The benefits of this are clear: my online banking details should not be visible to scripts that come from different sites. This prevents attackers from executing scripts on one site that access sensitive information that originated on another site such as an online banking authentication cookie. Read More →